Our View: PIE boosts book buying with grant

Published 11:17 am Saturday, February 11, 2017

Partners In Education Director Greg Yates has been making his rounds to local elementary schools this month passing out money to help underprivileged students.

Each elementary school will receive $500 from PIE, which was funded through a grant from the Clark County Fiscal Court.

The money is to be used to help students purchase books at upcoming book fairs.

Reading is an important part of a student’s personal and educational development. According to a report release by the National Literacy Trust, “Reading for pleasure: A research overview,” reading “allows us to learn about other people, about history, about social studies, the language arts, science, mathematics and other content subjects that must be mastered in school.”

And as noted by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, “people cannot be active or informed citizens unless they can read. Reading is a prerequisite for almost all cultural and social activities.”

To put it simply, mastering the skill of reading is one that opens a world of opportunities. Mastering and honing that skill at a young age sets students up for even more success in the classroom and later in their careers.

For many children from low-income families, purchasing books to read at home is not a priority. When money must be spent on basic necessities, like rent and groceries, it can become difficult to buy “leisure reading” books.

However, keeping books at home enhances what students are learning at school and can improve vocabulary, comprehensive skills and broaden creativity.

PIE does so much great work for our schools by supporting students of all economic, social and cultural backgrounds — whether by placing volunteer tutors in the schools, rewarding students for keeping good grades or providing money to help students buy books.

The act of buying a book for a student may seem small, but in the grand scheme, providing access to literature can have a huge impact.

Thanks to PIE, its volunteers and the Fiscal Court for partnering to brighten the day and the future of some of Clark County’s needy students.