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Trainer helps others improve health, fitness

Now that the new year has begun, many gyms are seeing an increase in memberships from those who have resolved to get in shape or lose weight for the new year. But despite the well-intentioned surge, many wind up falling away from their resolutions.

That is where people like Jamie Ness come in. Ness is a personal trainer with a master’s degree in kinesiology who works at Winchester-Clark County Parks and Recreation.

Each year Ness helps people learn how to safely start the process of getting back in shape, using experience and science to find the best results.

“I started as a coach 10 years ago and coached middle school track,” Ness said.

However, Ness said he soon discovered coaching wasn’t what he was passionate about, and he decided to start doing personal training as a fall-back. It was then he discovered that he loved helping others meet their goals.

“I like the fact that it’s so personal,” Ness said. “I get to make personal connections with people, and in most circumstances, I’m able to help them.”

Ness said in order to be successful when starting a new workout regimen, most people need three things. First, they need to have a long-term goal they are passionate about and are willing to make sacrifices for. Second, they need to balance that end goal with smaller goals to help keep them on track. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, they need someone to keep them accountable.

“Losing weight isn’t complex, it’s just hard,” he said. “A lot of really smart scientists have already figured out what needs to be done, it’s just difficult to do it. It all comes down to burning more than you take in.”

To help people keep the dedicated mindset they need for success, Ness said he encourages everyone he works with to keep close track of all the food they eat. He also tries to keep workouts positive and point out the good things people are doing in getting healthy.

“It helps to have someone who is cheering for you,” he said.

Ness said he cautions people about trying to lose weight solely through dieting.

“Diets work, but they are temporary,” he said.

He said when it comes to working out, consistency is better for long-term results than intensity. Someone who does a moderate workout all year long will get better results than someone who sporadically does intensive workouts without any regular schedule.

Finally, Ness said working with a professional is a good way to help start the process or stay on track if someone finds themselves faltering.

Ness said working out with a partner or friend is an option as well, but people should be careful when selecting who to get healthy with.

“Don’t pick someone who is negative or will cave early,” Ness said. “Partners should support and encourage each other.”

To contact Ness about training sessions, contact him at jamie.ness@uky.edu.