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What’s Happening at the Library: Spring gardening

By John Maruskin

This time of year gardeners flock to the Clark County Public Library.

They come, of course, for seeds from the Seed Library but just as often they come to check out gardening books, bookazines and to talk the library director and members of our staff about gardening projects and procedures.

It’s a lot of fun and very gratifying for members of the library staff. Even when early spring snow is on the ground, the library is all about growing plants.

With that in mind, there are three programs coming up on Sunday, April 22, and Saturday, April 28, that everyone who has an interest in gardening, beginners to master gardeners, will want to keep in mind.

Get your CCPL gardening calendars out now and circle the dates and times.

From 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Sunday, April 22,  you can learn about “Gardening for Hummers and Buzzers: Inviting Pollinators Home for Dinner.”

You’ll learn some of the best ways to invite Kentucky’s native and visiting hummingbird species, bees, butterflies and moths into your yard by creating small insect habitat to attract beneficial species.

Attendees will take home six packets of heirloom flower seeds guaranteed to attract these mighty mini-critters including California Giant zinnia mix, Southeast Wildflower seed mix, Miss Wilmott zinnia, Purple Prince zinnia, Super Cactus Lilac Emperor zinnia and Lemon      Bee Balm.

From 11 a.m. until noon Saturday, April 28, “Gardens for Victory.” Learn Victory Garden methods that were used during the first and second world wars, and how to tweak those methods for today’s front and backyard gardens.

You’ll also get ideas for layering annual veggies with easy-to-grow (and maintain) perennial edible flowers and herbs like day lilies and oregano to attract beneficial birds and bugs.

Attendees will receive a Victory Garden in a Bag! Ten packets of heirloom AAS winners and home garden mainstay varieties including Cherokee Wax beans (1947), Little Marvel peas (1900 UK/1908 US), Straight 8 cucumbers (1935), Early White Vienna kohlrabi (1884), Bloomsdale Longstanding spinach (1925), Cocozelle zucchini (19th century), Rutgers tomato (1937), Italian Large Leaf basil (18th century) Ruby Queen beet (1957), and Sparky marigold (circa 1945).

From 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 28, bring your seeds and plants to swap and share with other gardeners. Please make sure your seeds and plants are labeled.

If you want to bring extra containers, they will be appreciated but please make sure they are clean. The library will have paper and plastic bags available.

All three of these informative gardening events are free and open to the public.

Call 859-744-5661 to register or sign-up using the Library’s Evanced online registration system at www.clarkbooks.org. You must sign up for each event you want to attend. Signing up for one will not make you registered for all of them. If you have any questions, please call the Library.

Programs this week include:

— At 10 a.m. Tuesday, Internet 2. The class had to be canceled last week, so this is a makeup session. Easy Email will be offered on Tuesday, April 24. You must register to attend these programs.

—At 2 p.m. Wednesday, Kentucky Picture Show presents a classic whodunnit. While traveling in continental Europe in 1938, a rich young playgirl realizes that an elderly lady seems to have disappeared from their train.

— At noon Thursday, Book Lunchers discuss “A Man Called Ove.” Please register to attend by noon Wednesday.

— From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Outside the Lines Adult Coloring.

Those of you who wondered about my reference in the second paragraph to the CCPL Gardening Calendar need to know there is such a calendar and it is full of great gardening information, moon signs, special planting dates, even dates to just take a day off and read.

The calendar is illustrated with pictures of Clark County gardens. These calendars are excellent gardening organizers and cost $3. Pick one up when you come to the next weekend’s gardening events.

John Maruskin is director of adult services at the Clark County Public Library. He can be reached at john.clarkbooks@gmail.com.